DCI Indonesia goes public, data center shares soar 25% on first day

DCI Indonesia (DCII), one of the country’s leading data center operators, went public on the Indonesia Stock Exchange (IDX) on Wednesday, 6th January 2021.

DCII released 357 million new shares in its IPO with an offering price of $0.030 (Rp 420) per share. This is equivalent to 15% of the company’s issued capital and paid-up capital. 

Upon its debut on the IDX, DCII’s shares rose 25% to $0.038 (Rp 525) per share.

CEO Toto Sugiri said that the decision to go public is part of the company’s growth strategy. As the global demand for cloud technology continues to rise, the hyperscale data center industry in Indonesia is expected to benefit greatly from this boom.

Toto Sugiri also announced that in the first quarter of 2021, the company will operate four more data centers with a total capacity of 37 Megawatt (MW) in Indonesia to meet the market demand.

“The data center market is estimated to have a total capacity of 72.5 MW by the end of 2020 and according to the projections of Structure Research it will continue to grow with a CAGR of 22.3% over the next five years,” he pointed out.

Established in 2011 and operating since 2013, DCII is the first Tier IV certified data center provider in Southeast Asia.

Indosat Ooredoo partners with Ericsson to continue its digital transformation

Indosat Ooredoo, Indonesia’s largest telecommunications provider, has selected Ericsson to digitally transform its business support systems for a fully digitised customer experience.

Indosat Ooredoo will leverage Ericsson’s Digital Monetisation Platform (DMP) to boost its 5G, IoT, and digital services offerings to individual customers and enterprises.

Medhat Elhusseiny, Chief Technology and Information Officer at Indosat Ooredoo, said that with Ericsson’s DMP, Indosat Ooredoo will enable the simplification of business processes, and flexible integration of third-party services for a more enjoyable user experience.

The platform includes open APIs and micro services architecture that supports speedy integration of new channels and services. Through DevOps, business activities such as new services design, orchestration and monetisation are expected to be carried out more efficiently.

“This partnership will drive agility and innovation to continue enhancing our customer experience for both consumers and enterprises,” said Mr. Elhusseiny.

With the platform, Indosat Ooredoo will be able to reduce cost for streamlined operations, thereby increasing their competitiveness in Indonesia’s telecommunications market.

“Ericsson’s Digital Monetisation Platform will empower Indosat Ooredoo to monetise assets while meeting customer demands with new offers and enable flexibility to meet market demands,” said Jerry Soper, Country Head of Ericsson Indonesia.

Indosat Ooredoo and Ericsson have a longstanding partnership that dates back to collaborations in 2G, 3G, and 4G technology.

Indonesian Government signs 5G deal with Huawei

Indonesia has signed a deal with Huawei to develop 5G in the country, the first agreement of its kind that the Government has entered into.

As part of a Memorandum of Understanding, a series of collaborations across multiple organisations are expected. According to NikkeiAsia, the agreement will see Huawei assisting the Indonesian government in 5G and other related tech fields, including training 100,000 professionals in next-generation tech skills, such as cloud computing.

Next, Indonesia’s second-largest telco, Indosat Ooredoo, will be assisted by Huawei with the installment of 5G infrastructure that will be powered by SRv6, the first segment routing technology of its kind in the Asia Pacific.

On top of that, the Chinese tech giant will also be working with an Indonesian Government agency in the development of AI.

Both Ericsson and Nokia have launched tests for 5G in Indonesia, but ‘Huawei equipment are 20-30% less costly, and the quality is advancing’, according to a person close to Telekomunikasi Indonesia, the state-owned telecom, who spoke to NikkeiAsia.

“With Huawei’s help, we expect to bring the level of our human resources up to international standards,” said a source close to the Indonesian presidential office to NikkeiAsia.

Huawei has been actively partnering with governments and enterprises in Southeast Asia to expand its digital footprint in the region, particularly in Indonesia and Thailand.

Huawei currently has a 5G research center, and two data centers in Thailand with a third one coming in 2021. In October, the Thai Government signed a three-year MoU with Huawei that will see the company provide tech upskill training to ICT professionals in Thailand.

By Jie Yee Ong, Tech Reporter

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Is your country a Digital Riser? ESCP study reveals surprising results

While countries like the USA and Sweden may be losing their position as digital champions, the Philippines and Singapore have both been labelled a digital riser that is capable of taking on the competitive technology landscape.

The European Center for Digital Competitiveness found that mature digital hubs are facing new and dynamic competition from around the world.

“We are in the middle of a digital revolution that is very likely being accelerated by the Covid-19 pandemic,” says Professor Philip Meissner of the European Center for Digital Competitiveness by ESCP Business School in Berlin.

The ESCP’s Digital Riser Report 2020 revealed that the Philippines was one of the top Digital Risers in the world due to the country showing strong digital transformation results encouraged by Government policies like the Innovate Start-up Act and Start-up Venture Fund.

Amongst the other top risers in Asia include South Korea, Japan, Thailand, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Pakistan and Nepal.

Digital Riser Rankings for East Asia and the Pacific
Digital Riser Rankings for East Asia and the Pacific

The rankings were by two dimensions: ecosystem and mindset. The ecosystem dimension includes venture capital availability, cost and time to start a business, the ease of hiring foreign labour, and the skillset of graduates. While the mindset dimension focuses on digital skills among active populations, attitudes to entrepreneurial risk, workforce diversity, mobile broadband subscriptions, and companies embracing disruptive ideas.

Dropping in the rankings were India, Vietnam and New Zealand, which declined in the ecosystem dimension, despite their digital aspirations and future-forward plans.

The report also shed light on the two global digital superpowers, namely the United States and China. Analysis found that China has gained in digital competitiveness while the United States lost strength over the last three years. 

What makes a Digital Riser?

Top Digital Risers share one thing in common. They have displayed a deliberate and comprehensive government programme with top-level support around digitalisation and entrepreneurship. 

“The way that governments manage and navigate this transition will significantly determine how competitive and prosperous their countries will be in the decades ahead,” said Professor Meissner.

Interestingly, country size is not a limiting factor. The report saw countries of all sizes enhancing their digital competitiveness in the short to medium term by taking effective measures like emphasising the importance of digital education, encouraging entrepreneurship and making huge investments in digitalisation.

Digital Riser Rankings for South Asia
Digital Riser Rankings for South Asia

“While the top Digital Risers come in very different sizes and have their unique economic histories, there’s a lot that governments can learn from them,” said Dr Christian Poensgen from the ESCP.

Breaking down the commonalities in top Digital Risers, Dr Poensgen identified that they tend to emphasise the importance of digital education like Indonesia’s institutions that seek to build a strong tech talent pool in which the Government invested US$7.7 million to provide certifications to 20,000 digital talents.

Next, he identified that huge investments in digitalisation are common, as countries like Thailand announced a  $570m venture fund for startups in ten supported industries, including digital, next generation cars and smart electronics.

And finally, a digital riser shows commitment to entrepreneurship, with many following the example of China’s government, which has made it a focal point of the ‘Chinese Dream’.

The Digital Riser Report was published for the first time this year, and will now be distributed annually, so it will be interesting to see if any of the countries that ranked low this year will rise up in 2021.

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Explore the latest for cloud and data centers in Malaysia

Malaysia is an exciting emerging market in the cloud and data center industry, but how can you tap into this lucrative market?

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NTT helps 1,000 employees at Indonesia’s WOM Finance move to the cloud with Google’s G Suite

Indonesia’s Wahana Ottomitra Multiartha (WOM Finance) has successfully migrated to Google’s cloud-native platform G Suites with the help of NTT.

The global technology services provider NTT helped more than 1,000 employees at the Jakarta-based financial services provider move from their legacy mail server to G Suite within a month to accelerate their access to intelligent cloud-based apps. This signals the company’s commitment to implementing digital transformation in the workplace. 

“By going digital, we can make faster decisions in a safe and secure manner that will translate into better customer experience,” said Anthony Y. Panggabean, Director of WOM Finance.

Prior to the transition, WOM Finance’s daily operations were restricted by a mail server that was unable to handle scaling up to meet growing business demands. The lack of a centralised communications platform also meant that correspondence between employees were carried out independently “without explicit IT department approval”.

With Google G Suites being introduced to the workplace, WOM Finance’s business activities are now condensed in a single platform. 

Felix Priscellius, IT Division Head for WOM Finance, said they have experienced cost savings, less downtime and greater security, enabling them to scale up as quickly as the business grows.

In a time where remote and mobile-first working environments are more common than ever, WOM Finance’s digital transformation is a prime example of how cloud-based technologies are being adopted at a rapid pace with the help of cloud-based experts.

“We are truly excited about empowering WOM Finance on their workplace transformation journey to discover more dynamic ways to collaborate securely,” said Hendra Lesmana, the CEO for NTT Indonesia Solutions.

NTT has made many strides this year to expand their digital footprint and strengthen their cloud strategies through partnerships with Megaport and Microsoft.

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Explore the latest for cloud and data centers in Indonesia

Indonesia is an exciting emerging market in the cloud and data center industry, with advancements happening all the time.

Register now to explore what the future holds for cloud and data centers in Indonesia at our Digital Summit

Get involved in the conversation and connect with your peers on LinkedIn and Facebook using #WMediaEvent!

> View all W.Media digital events

Indosat Ooredoo innovates to support Indonesia during pandemic

A few months ago, Indonesia became the epicenter of the COVID-19 outbreak in Southeast Asia.

As the Government continues to battle the pandemic, one of the country’s main telecommunications companies, Indosat Ooredoo, prioritised innovating hybrid cloud products and upgrading Internet bandwidth to put Indonesia back in motion even during lockdown.

As Indonesia began to adapt to new habits during the ‘new normal’, Indosat Ooredoo took a supportive role to accelerate technologies, including big data, smart cities and video conferencing to resurrect Indonesia’s economy.

Back to School for Indonesia

To support the Indonesian government’s Distance Learning (PJJ) program, the telco upgraded its existing bandwidth activity by 20% to provide 56 universities better access to intellectual property from more than 200 tertiary institutions in Indonesia.

“Indosat Ooredoo decided to make a contribution in developing our nation through education. We are committed to supporting the government to strengthen the ecosystem of online learning,” said Director & Chief Operating Officer Indosat Ooredoo, Vikram Sinha.

The telco introduced a series of mobile packages to primary school, high school and university students, with a main package offering 30GB of data for a single Indonesian Rupiah, which converts to an astounding US$0.000068.

The Director General of Higher Education, Professor Nizam, thanked Indosat Ooredoo for their contribution to Indonesia’s education sector: “We highly appreciate the concern and the effort Indosat Ooredoo has taken to help college students by providing affordable internet packages.”

With these affordable data packages, it is almost certain that data consumption will continue to rise in the country, requiring reliable digital infrastructures to manage this. To support this demand, tech giants and data center players like Google Cloud, Alibaba Cloud, SpaceDC and NTT are making moves into the country.

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Is cloud hosting right for your business?

Hosting websites and applications on the cloud is becoming a popular choice for businesses, as it is believed to offer greater flexibility and speed in scalability as well as reliable uptime to keep your services live even if a server goes down.

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Indonesia to build Government Cloud as part of digital transformation efforts

Indonesia is set to build a Government Cloud platform as part of the state’s digital transformation plans, announced the Director General of Information & Communication Technology Applications, Semuel Abrijani Pangerapan.

The Government has taken French and South Korean foreign loans and/or grants to build two data centers and a government network, CNN Indonesia reported.

“We are discussing whether two is enough. There may be three, but this has not been decided yet,” said Mr. Pangerapan.

During a video conference on Tuesday, it was revealed there are 2,700 data centers and server rooms, but only 3% were declared eligible as data centers, while the rest are simply minimalist server rooms.

“Without good network technology, we are very vulnerable to attack. That’s why we will design a Government network,” said Mr. Pangerapan.

The data centers constructed by the Government will be connected to existing facilities at the Agency for the Assessment and Application of Technology, the Registration of the Ministry of Home Affairs and the Ministry of Finance.

“We will operate the data centers later to become a connected Government Cloud service,” added Mr. Pangerapan.

The data center and Indonesia Government Cloud will be managed by the Ministry of Communication and Information Technology in the form of a Technical Implementing Unit and a Center for Electronic-Based Government System Infrastructure (SPBE).

Is cloud hosting right for your business?

Hosting websites and applications on the cloud is becoming a popular choice for businesses, as it is believed to offer greater flexibility and speed in scalability as well as reliable uptime to keep your services live even if a server goes down.

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FLOU Cloud launched on Indonesia’s 75th Independence Day as multi hybrid cloud service supported by Telkom Group

FLOU Cloud, a multi hybrid cloud service, has been launched with support by Telkom Group during Indonesia’s 75th Independence Day.

Supported by the state-owned telecommunications conglomerate, the new cloud computing service is aimed at providing small and medium enterprises as well as startups with ‘next generation cloud’ technology to accelerate business growth.

“FLOU Cloud is our breakthrough by using high-end technology to manage hybrid multi cloud with high capacity and high capabilities,” said Tanto Suratno, the Business and Sales Director of FLOU Cloud.

The solutions offered by FLOU Cloud include compute, storage, network and security as well as Software-as-a-Service (SaaS).

The services are supported by IT infrastructure in more than ten Uptime Institute Tier 3 and Tier 4 certified data centers and more than 15 local and international network providers and carrier neutral data centers.

“Many companies have been affected by COVID-19. Although some are starting to rise and make updates in their business, information technology-based solutions are very important so that SME operations can continue during this pandemic,” said Mr. Suratno.

Cloud adoption in Indonesia is rising exponentially, leading to the country being considered a ‘hotspot’ for hyperscale data center investment within the next five years. The country is expected to experience investments worth over US$1 billion at an annual growth rate of 11% between 2019 and 2025.

This is already happening with moves being made by major players, including AWS, Alibaba Cloud, Equinix, Google, NTT, Princeton Digital Group, and SpaceDC.

Is cloud hosting right for your business?

Hosting websites and applications on the cloud is becoming a popular choice for businesses, as it is believed to offer greater flexibility and speed in scalability as well as reliable uptime to keep your services live even if a server goes down.

But is it right for your business? Register now and join industry experts and peers for our Inside Asia digital event to get the answers!

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NTT Global Data Centers to expand into India, Indonesia and Malaysia

NTT Ltd. has announced plans to expand its Global Data Centers division in nine locations, including India, Indonesia and Malaysia.

Japan’s largest telecommunications company and one of the world’s largest data center providers will provide over 400 megawatts of IT load across all nine markets upon completion of the new data centers.

“Organizations today demand an ever-expanding global platform to reach their growing digital business objectives,” said Masaaki Moribayashi, the Senior Executive Vice President of Services for NTT Ltd.

NTT selected locations to support interconnected ecosystems around ‘the world’s most important business and government hubs’.

“Our data centers will include the latest data center technology for security, reliability and energy efficiency,” added Mr. Moribayashi.

All nine new data centers will be set up for clients to use renewable energy if they choose, as NTT has committed to investing in a sustainable future for the planet.

“We are pleased to leverage our deep construction expertise and the strength of our capital resources to extend our line of data center facilities – with more to come,” said Ryuichi Matsuo, the Executive Vice President for NTT’s Global Data Centers division.

When will NTT’s new data centers go live?

One of the first of NTT’s nine data centers to be completed will be in Mumbai, India, which is expected to go live by this quarter. The Mumbai 7 Data Center will offer a 25MW IT load and will be the third facility in NTT’s Chandivali campus.

Also this quarter, NTT will open data centers in London and Tokyo as well as Oregon and Virginia in the United States.

In the fourth quarter of 2020, NTT aims to open its fifth data center in Cyberjaya, Malaysia. The new Cyberjaya 5 Data Center will have a 5.6MW critical IT load, designed to meet the requirements of hyperscalers and high-end enterprises.

The telecommunications giant also plans to go live with new facilities in Munich, Germany and Chicago, USA.

Finally, in the first half of 2021, NTT will go live with Indonesia’s largest data center known as Indonesia Jakarta 3 Data Center. The new campus in Bekasi, Indonesia will be capable of 45MW of critical IT load once fully developed.

“By increasing our global footprint during this pandemic, we can support our clients as their demand increases for reliable, robust cloud services, cloud communications, digital entertainment and new technology such as artificial intelligence,” said Mr. Matsuo.

In 2019, NTT created their new Global Data Centers division, combining subsidiaries, including e-shelter, Gyron, NetMagic, DPA, Nexcenter and RagingWire.

The nine new data centers by NTT will add to their current 500,000 square metres of colocation space across 160 data centers located in more than 20 countries and regions.

Earlier this month, NTT also announced the launch of a new Private Cloud for Enterprise service in Hong Kong and Singapore today to be a core component of their Intelligent Data Center and hybrid cloud capabilities.

Take a deep dive into Japan’s cloud and data center market

Japan has an exciting future ahead in the cloud and data center space. The cloud services market is forecasted to be worth US$6 billion this year and many colocation data center providers have invested heavily in the country, including NTT, Equinix, Digital Realty and more.

But what does the future hold for the markets in Japan?

Register for free to discover how you can tap into Japan’s bright future at our next Market Briefing on Thursday 5 November.

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SpaceDC brings first green data center to Indonesia powered by its people

SpaceDC is bringing the first green data center to Indonesia, powered by a world-class team of individuals who are passionate about delivering a reliable and resilient network.

The Singapore-based data center provider recently welcomed Elisabeth Simatupang as their new Country Manager for Indonesia who has big plans for the future.

With experience building 1,000 telecom towers per year with Bali Towers as well as international expertise working with AWS in Sweden, Ms. Simatupang brings strong local knowledge of Indonesia backed by precise understanding of international standards.

Ms. Simatupang hopes to stand out in the Indonesia market by achieving SpaceDC’s vision of creating an interconnected data center platform throughout Asia that is environmentally friendly and operates to international standards, helping end users to manage their data more efficiently on one platform that brings down their total cost of ownership.

Building the first green data center in Indonesia with SpaceDC

Indonesia is one of the world’s largest greenhouse gas emitters, and data centers are a significant culprit of producing a large carbon footprint. As a result, lowering the environmental impact of data centers is at the heart of SpaceDC’s philosophy.

To achieve this, SpaceDC’s first green data center campus in Jakarta will be powered by natural gas – a first for Indonesia. This solution reduces both the environmental impact and increases the overall fault tolerance of the site.

The data center will also be able to recycle waste heat from gas generators by passing it through a heat exchanger in the absorption chillers, producing more chilled water for its Cold Room Air Conditioners that cool down the data center halls.

The 26.6MW Indonesian campus has achieved a Power Usage Effectiveness rating of 1.3, while other data centers are said to be struggling at 2 PUE.

But SpaceDC‘s commitment to achieving an environmentally friendly legacy doesn’t stop there, as the team plans to further reduce the PUE of their facilities, which benefits customers by lowering the total cost of ownership. 

However, achieving sustainable and reliable power for data centers in Indonesia is challenging, as the national energy grid produces insufficient electrical generation capacity and a weak quality of power.

To overcome this, most data centers in Indonesia usually build their facilities inside industrial estates that have a shared power plant, which typically makes the cost of powering a facility more expensive.

SpaceDC has gone a step further by building their own power plant in Jakarta, which they manage 100% to generate the absorption chiller at their data center campus. 

To ensure the reliability of the facility, the power and cooling systems are also supported by diesel generators and electric chillers as well as an additional backup from the Government power utility in Jakarta, which is typically more reliable compared to other regions in Indonesia.

As a result, SpaceDC solidified their ability to reliably power their campus by achieving an Uptime Tier III certification at their JAK2 facility. Not only that, but SpaceDC also recently achieved the recognition of being the first OCP Ready™ facility in Asia by proving its ability to design highly efficient data centers and meet Open Compute Project Foundation guidelines.

The team is looking to set the bar high in the future, as they strive to secure a Tier IV classification at their upcoming JAK 1 data center, which would be a particularly unique achievement for a facility in an emerging market.

SpaceDC’s JAK1 and JAK2 facilities that make up Indonesia’s first green data center campus

Delivering sustainable interconnectivity for Indonesia

On top of having the first green data center in Indonesia, SpaceDC’s goal is to provide an interconnected platform in the country that makes managing data footprints across regions easier and more efficient for businesses.

Driven by Indonesia’s tremendous growth in Internet accessibility as well as customers’ desire for connectivity and speed, SpaceDC will work with private cloud companies and internet service providers to bring hub cities and emerging markets together.

Elisabeth Simatupang, SpaceDC's Country Manager for Indonesia
Elisabeth Simatupang, SpaceDC’s Country Manager for Indonesia

Ms. Simatupang believed the best way to stand out in Indonesia is by achieving international standards in Internet connectivity, as most traditional data centers in Indonesia have not reached this status.

The data center provider is in the process of building partnerships with all the biggest ISPs in Indonesia, including Telkom, Indosat and CBN who have links with the country’s biggest transmission backbone project to deliver reliable network connectivity and flexibility for customers.

To fulfil international standards for interconnectivity, Jakarta is the place to be.

SpaceDC carefully selected their data center campus to be located in the capital city, as it has some of the best fiber optic transmission ability and reliability when compared to other areas. Their campus is designed with four meet-me rooms and three different entry points from three different directions of fiber optic coming into the campus, making for resilient and reliable network connectivity.

Expanding out from Indonesia, SpaceDC has ambitious plans for the future by targeting emerging markets and hub cities across Asia to create a unique interconnected platform.

By providing a reliable interconnected platform for emerging markets like Indonesia, SpaceDC enables more data load capacity in these markets, rather than feeding in capacity from other countries with more mature data center markets like Singapore.

Achieving the interconnected green data center dream with people power

SpaceDC has identified the hub cities and emerging they want to expand into within the next five years, based on the demand from their customers and megawatt capacity needs in their facilities.

Carolyn Harrington, SpaceDC's Chief Operating Officer
Carolyn Harrington, SpaceDC’s Chief Operating Officer

The Chief Operating Officer of SpaceDC, Carolyn Harrington, said with confidence: “I’d be surprised if we haven’t delivered more based on the speed of the market.”

However, a data center would not function without a team of talented people who have the technical prowess and ability to understand the individual needs of end users.

SpaceDC is in the process of building a team who are empowered and motivated to deliver their five-year vision.

“A business is a vision and mission, but this only eventuates if you have the right team,” said Ms. Harrington.

In the current economic climate affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, many business plans have been put into question and a state of uncertainty. But the SpaceDC team has stayed strong in continuing to work towards this vision.


Ms. Harrington said: “I’m overwhelmed but not surprised at how well the team is doing because they’re an amazing bunch of professionals who take great pride in their work.

“I honestly cannot thank them enough. I am not surprised at how well the team is doing because they’re an amazing bunch of professionals who take great pride in their work,” she added.

Supported by their passionate team with over 60 years of combined industry experience, SpaceDC is driven to stand out by designing and operating efficient, resilient and network-rich data centers that prioritise each individual customer’s idiosyncratic needs whilst remaining environmentally friendly.

> Find out more about SpaceDC’s mission

By Stuart Crowley, Editor, W.Media

SpaceDC Indonesia data center becomes the first OCP Ready™ facility in Asia

Singapore-based data center provider SpaceDC has become the first OCP Ready™ facility in Asia.

The Open Compute Project Foundation (OCP) awarded SpaceDC’s facility in Indonesia with the certification after demonstrating its ability to create highly efficient data centers and meet OCP guidelines.

SpaceDC achieved another first in Asia by securing OCP’s Colo Solution Provider status, exhibiting ‘strong technical, service and support capabilities to enable scalable deployments of OCP infrastructure’.

“This certification certainly affirms SpaceDC’s mission of being an efficient, reliable and scalable data center platform for businesses looking to expand in the region,” Darren Hawkins, the CEO of SpaceDC.

SpaceDC’s JAK2 facility will be part of Indonesia’s first green data center campus, which will be powered by natural gas for electricity and waste heat for the cooling absorption chillers.

The facility is also designed to Uptime Tier III standards and achieved a power usage effectiveness of 1.3.

Steve Helvie, Vice President of Channel Development for OCP, described SpaceDC‘s achievement as displaying the capacity for OCP solutions to continue  growing and evolving across Asia. This will result in a need for more facilities and operators who understand the needs of enterprise companies looking to adopt more open hardware designs, he said.

”I would like to congratulate SpaceDC for becoming the first OCP Ready™ facility in Asia, which is an incredible achievement,” celebrated Mr. Helvie.

What does it take to become an OCP Ready data center?

The OCP Ready™ Facility Recognition Program is one of the Open Compute Project Foundation’s newest certifications.

The program recognises data centers that meet guidelines and show an operator’s understanding of the fundamental facility requirements to deploy OCP hardware into their IT space.

“Throughout the process for JAK2 to be certified as OCP Ready™, their team has demonstrated a deep technical knowledge and understanding of what it means to create an optimised data center facility for hosting OCP IT gear,” said Mark Dansie, a key member of the OCP DC Facilities Project Team and leader of the OCP Ready™ program.

SpaceDC’s OCP Ready™ facility is now listed on the OCP Marketplace as a result of their success.

Mr. Dansie added: “This new colo facility is a fantastic addition to the growing portfolio of OCP Ready™ data centers and will enable SpaceDC’s OCP customers to take full advantage of the TCO benefits of deploying OCP technology.”

Why is it important to be OCP Ready?

Data centers that are optimised for open infrastructure are becoming ever more crucial to meet the demands of cloud service providers (CSP’s), telcos and enterprises, as they move toward digital transformation.

Open Compute Project’s collaborative Community strives to optimise all parts of a data center, from open hardware designs to network architecture to provide efficient, scalable computing.

At our next free Tech Talk, Steve Helvie, OCP’s VP of Channel, will show us why tech giants and data center players have joined the OCP Community to develop the OCP hardware market into a US$10 billion industry.

OCP Colo Solution providers like Giga Data Centers, Rackspace, Kao Data and Hydro66 have all received the OCP Ready™ stamp of approval along with SpaceDC

> Take a look inside an OCP-Optimised Data Center in Southeast Asia

Meet the OCP Colo Facility Guidelines for OCP Racks and complete the Colo Site Assessment

To become an OCP Ready™ data center operators are required to meet the OCP Colo Facility Guidelines for deploying OCP hardware in commercially available, colocation data centers.

Solution providers are also required to be an OCP member in good standing and complete the OCP Ready Colo Site Assessment. This site assessment covers everything from building access, electrical and cooling capabilities, to efficiency, cabling and openness of information.

To meet the guidelines, facilities must allow end-users to smoothly deploy fully populated OCP Racks without delay.

OCP Ready™ data centers must be able to easily accommodate racks weighing 500kg and be able to deploy multiple racks at scale.

In our next Tech Talk with OCP, we will be joined by Resul Altinkilic of Rittal, an OCP Platinum Member who specialises in developing and influencing the future of OCP roadmaps in Rack, Cooling and Power.

Mr. Altinkilic will take us through the importance of Open Hardware and Open Rack infrastructure in achieving an optimised and efficient data center.

To explore what it takes to become an OCP-optimised data center, we will also hear from the CEO of SpaceDC, Darren Hawkins. 

Mr. Hawkins will share how SpaceDC achieved the recognition of being the first OCP Ready™ data center in Asia after meeting all guidelines and successfully passing the OCP Ready Colo Site Assessment.

Register for free to take a journey through an OCP Optimised Data Center in Southeast Asia on Wednesday 8 July.

Image credit: SpaceDC

Alibaba Cloud plans Southeast Asia expansion with new Indonesia data center and Philippines alliance

Alibaba Cloud has set in motion plans to expand into Southeast Asia with the announcement of their third data center in Indonesia and a Philippines Ecosystem Alliance.

The initiatives were driven by fast-growing demand from customers who are adopting cloud technologies and progressing digital transformation strategies at a rapid pace.

Not one, not two, but three data centers

Indonesia’s data center market is fueled by an increasing number of Internet and social media users as well as greater connectivity and cloud adoption across the country.

The Minister of Communication and Information Technology, Johnny G. Plate believed Alibaba Cloud’s third data center will accelerate the country’s digital transformation efforts.

The expansion comes after Alibaba Cloud built its first data center in 2018, and a second last year. Upon completion of the third in 2021, Alibaba Cloud will have 64 availability zones across 21 regions worldwide.

The digital technology and intelligence backbone of Alibaba Group also announced its plan to build the first data scrubbing center in the country to help customers fend off cyberattacks, particularly affecting the finance and gaming industries.

“Cyberattacks have grown in intensity and sophistication, especially at a time when more businesses are moving their IT infrastructure onto cloud,” said Leon Chen as Country Manager at Alibaba Cloud Indonesia.

Alibaba Cloud’s new scrubbing center will help detect, analyse and remove large volumes of malicious traffic to defend distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks.

As Southeast Asia’s largest and fastest growing digital economy, other tech giants including Google and AWS have also expanded their services in Indonesia.

Alibaba Cloud was also named the largest IaaS provider in Asia Pacific by a recent Gartner report, while Tencent Cloud was third across the region and Huawei Cloud placed third in China.

Accelerating digital transformation in the Philippines

Along with their announcement for a third data center in Indonesia, Alibaba Cloud also revealed the formation of the Alibaba Cloud Philippines Ecosystem Alliance to speed up digital transformation in the country.

“The Philippines is a booming market with a big group of young and digital savvy population. There is strong demand for digital transformation in accordance with the local government’s ‘cloud-first’ initiative,” said Leo Liu, General Manager of Hong Kong, Macau, Korea and Philippines for Alibaba Cloud Intelligence.

The alliance will bring together thousands of Alibaba Cloud’s partners and customers to promote cloud adoption and analytics intelligence for businesses of all sizes.

“Digitalisation will be the global economic bedrock in the post-COVID era. This is why we are determined to enhance our efforts in supporting businesses here in their digital transformation journeys,” said Allen Guo, Alibaba Cloud’s Head for Philippines.

The global cloud provider will invest US$283 million this year to train partners and create solutions as well as committing to the aim of training 50,000 IT professionals and certifying at least 10,000 of these within the next three years.

Alibaba Cloud recently worked with telecommunications giant PLDT to provide hybrid cloud and security solutions for eSports matches during the Southeast Asian Games in 2019.

PLDT’s Enterprise and International Data Regional Head for Asia Pacific, Jeff Mendoza, said: “We are looking forward to fortifying this partnership and cooperation as we face this new era of cloud modernisation.”

Over the next three years, the largest provider of public cloud services in China looks to continue its global expansion by investing an additional US$28 billion on its cloud infrastructure, from operating systems, servers, to chips and networks.

Looking to migrate your data to the cloud?

As more data center options become available throughout the world, you may be looking to migrate your data for optimum operational efficiency and digital transformation.

You might be overwhelmed by the amount of choices and questions you may have: Will this enable my digital transformation plans? Will my data be secure? How much will this cost?

We will answer all these questions and more at our ‘Data Center Selection & Migration in Asia Pacific’ digital event on Thursday 23 July.

Register for free today to find out how you can migrate your data effectively.

Get involved in conversation and connect with your peers on LinkedIn and Facebook using #WMediaEvent!

Google opens first cloud region in Indonesia to meet growing digital demands

Google Cloud has officially opened their first cloud region in Indonesia.

The new Google Cloud Platform region in Jakarta looks to accelerate the growth of developers and enterprises embracing cloud technology to drive one of the fastest growing economies in the world.

“Indonesia is full of opportunity. You’re one of the most creative, dynamic and entrepreneurial countries in Southeast Asia,” said Sundar Pichai, the CEO of Google and Alphabet.

A booming digital economy

Indonesia has more than 150 million Internet users and the fastest growing digital economy in Southeast Asia, expanding by more than 40% each year.

Due to rising digitisation and Internet traffic, Indonesia’s data center market is expected to grow at an annual rate of 11%, with more than US$1 billion in investments.

“The most exciting thing about Indonesia’s booming digital economy is how you’re using it to improve lives – from a new generation of young Indonesians working on big ideas for the future to new startups, whose innovations are spreading around the world,” said Mr. Pichai.

With lower latency access to data, artificial intelligence and analytics tools, the new region aims to support organisations in industries like financial services, healthcare, manufacturing, retail and logistics.

“I look forward to seeing how the region will use Google Cloud to build new businesses and unleash new opportunities for people in Indonesia and around the world,” added Mr. Pichai.

Google recently announced a partnership with XL Axiata to drive cloud migration in Indonesia by modernising their infrastructure and migrating 70% of workloads to the cloud within the next three years.

“Our collaboration around Partner Interconnect will enable companies of all sizes in Indonesia to gain access to high-speed connectivity to create a whole new world of experiences for their customers,” said Megawaty Khie, the Country Director of Google Cloud in Indonesia.

“Advancing forward together.”

Maju Sama-Sama or “advancing forward together” is Google Indonesia’s motto. The tech giant has made commitments to develop talent critical to digital transformation journeys and build a resilient future.

Google will empower this by delivering 150,000 hands-on training labs in Indonesia this year as well as digital scholarships with Indonesia’s Ministry of Communication and Information Technology to help people become GCP certified.

Johnny Plate, Indonesia’s Minister of Communication and Informatics, said: “Google Cloud’s presence will certainly be an important part of the strengthening and development of digitally-based technology in Indonesia.”

The Government of Indonesia hopes Google’s data center can take part in making the security and privacy of data stronger as well as accelerate the adoption of data analytics, AI and machine learning.

Indonesia is currently accelerating its digital transformation towards the digital society. The country is focusing on the completion of telecommunications infrastructure development, with specific attention to the middle mile and last mile networks. The country also aims to accelerate the adoption of 5G, construct national and Government data centers and develop digital talent.

“The launch of Google Cloud in Indonesia is an example of excellent synergy where the business world, private sector, join hands to support Government policy to meet the needs of state-of-the-art technology,” said Mr. Plate.

The new Google Cloud region in Indonesia adds to Google’s portfolio of nine locations in Asia Pacific, enabling Indonesian customers to localise their cloud usage rather than using services in other regions like Singapore and Sydney.

Other cloud providers like AWS and Microsoft are also looking to expand out into Indonesia to join Google and Alibaba.

Alibaba Cloud has already built its second data center in Indonesia and announced US$28 billion worth of data center investments covering 21 regions, including Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore to support digital transformation in a post-pandemic world.

Microsoft, one of Indonesia’s major cloud service providers, is also eying up the possibility of building a data center by investing US$2.5 billion to develop cloud-computing systems.

The largest public cloud provider in the world, Amazon Web Services, has announced plans to build several interconnected data centers by 2022. 

Industry Minister, Agus Gumiwang, said: “This investment can boost Indonesia to become a strategic digital hub. The AWS region in Indonesia will certainly support the startup ecosystem so it can grow rapidly.”

Indonesia has a vibrant technological future ahead – it will certainly be exciting to see the innovations resulting from the rapidly growing digital economy.

Image credit: Google Cloud

Looking to migrate your data to the cloud?

As more data center options become available throughout the world, you may be looking to migrate your data for optimum operational efficiency and digital transformation.

You might be overwhelmed by the amount of choices and questions you may have: Will this enable my digital transformation plans? Will my data be secure? How much will this cost?

We will answer all these questions and more at our ‘Data Center Selection & Migration in Asia Pacific’ digital event on Thursday 23 July.

Register for free today to find out how you can migrate your data effectively.

Get involved in conversation and connect with your peers on LinkedIn and Facebook using #WMediaEvent!

Google Cloud partners with XL Axiata to drive cloud migration in Indonesia

Google Cloud has entered into two strategic partnerships with XL Axiata to drive cloud migration and further digital transformation strategies in Indonesia.

As a leading telecommunications provider, XL Axiata aims to migrate 70% of workloads to the cloud within the next three years.

“XL Axiata is committed to the modernization of our infrastructure to get more business agility and increase application deployment velocity,” said Yessie D Yosetya, the Chief Information and Digital Officer at XL Axiata.

The Indonesian cellular provider will adopt Google Cloud’s Anthos to securely and consistently automate, manage and scale workloads across its hybrid- and multi-cloud environments.

Ms Yosetya added: “Anthos was a natural fit as it lets us adopt containers while letting Google, a leader in Kubernetes, manage our container infrastructure for us.”

The app modernisation platform known as Anthos will enable XL Axiata to extend its cloud capabilities across on-premise data centers and various cloud-based resources by using Google’s Kubernetes Engine.

“With Anthos, we’re providing a consistent platform for XL Axiata to deploy workloads both on-premises and in the cloud so they can accelerate their own digital transformation,” said Megawaty Khie, the Country Director of Google Cloud in Indonesia.

Transferring data between XL Axiata’s five data centers and Google’s global network

As part of the second partnership, XL Axiata has become a Google Cloud Interconnect Partner, which will bring high-speed connectivity, cloud services and digital growth opportunities.

Customers in Indonesia will be empowered to reliably transfer data between XL Axiata’s five data centers and Google’s global network.

Ms Khie said: “Our collaboration around Partner Interconnect will enable companies of all sizes in Indonesia to gain access to high-speed connectivity to create a whole new world of experiences for their customers.”

As part of the Interconnect partnership, Google’s Dedicated Interconnect service provides physical connections between XL Axiata’s data center network and the Google Cloud network through a private network rather than public Internet.

“This is indeed a win-win collaboration with XL Axiata,” celebrated Ms Khie.

A private network typically delivers ‘fewer points of failure where traffic might usually get dropped or disrupted and offers the added benefit of increased security and management functionality’.

XL Axiata also has plans to implement Google Cloud’s scalable data analytics platform to enhance customer experiences through data- and AI-driven technologies.

Leveraging on Indonesia’s cloud boom

Indonesia’s cloud market is booming, with a number of new hyperscale data centers announced by organisations, including Princeton Digital Group, Google, Alibaba Cloud, AWS and Microsoft.

“Service providers worldwide are embarking on transformation journeys centered on the cloud in order to drive new services, revenue opportunities and experiences,” said Ms Khie in a press release on Tuesday 9 June.

Indonesia is expected to experience investments worth over US1$ billion and an annual growth rate of 11% between 2019 and 2025.

Google’s Managing Director in Indonesia, Randy Jusuf, said the country’s ‘digital economy has become the largest in Southeast Asia’ and is projected to reach US$124.1 billion by 2025, triple the Rp 548.2 trillion it recorded in 2020.

XL Axiata’s partnership with Google Cloud looks to ‘serve the evolving needs of millions of companies across Indonesia’s rapidly digitizing economy’ by empowering cloud migration and digital transformation.

Last year, Princeton Digital Group, a leading investor, developer and operator of Internet infrastructure, acquired a 70% stake in XL Axiata’s data centers to give them a strong foundation to grow their business in Indonesia.

Following this acquisition, PDG looks to develop two new hyperscale greenfield builds that are slated to be ready by 2022.

Looking to migrate your data?

As more data center options become available throughout the world, you may be looking to migrate your data for optimum operational efficiency and digital transformation.

You might be overwhelmed by the amount of choices and questions you may have: Will this enable my digital transformation plans? Will my data be secure? How much will this cost?

We will answer all these questions and more at our ‘Data Center Selection & Migration in Asia Pacific’ digital event on Thursday 23 July.

Register for free today to find out how you can migrate your data effectively.

Get involved in conversation and connect with your peers on LinkedIn and Facebook using #WMediaEvent!

Princeton Digital Group targets untapped potential for hybrid cloud data centers amid rapid cloud computing growth in Indonesia

The data center landscape in Indonesia is growing exponentially, as industry players like Princeton Digital Group look to tap into a market full of large domestic enterprise customers, SMEs and a broad swath of global  multinational corporations.

To keep up with demand, Princeton Digital Group, a leading investor, developer and operator of Internet infrastructure, is developing two new hyperscale greenfield builds that are slated to be ready by 2022. One will be adjacent to their Cibitung facility in Jakarta and the other new build will be interconnected to their existing site in Surabaya.

Stephanus Tumbelaka, Princeton Digital Group’s Managing Director of Indonesia, said: “This market is quite dynamic and it has a significant amount of upside growth potential.”

Due to rising digitisation and Internet traffic, Indonesia’s data center market is expected to grow at an annual rate of 11%, with more than US$1 billion in investments.

Mr Tumbelaka said: “As you look across the entire country, Indonesia has many metro markets outside of Jakarta that have limited data center facilities and overall capacity.”

Along with the new facilities, Princeton Digital Group plans to upgrade their five existing facilities.

PDG has the most carrier neutral facilities in Indonesia, covering both Java and Sumatra islands and servicing customers across four different markets: Jakarta, Surabaya, Bandung and Pekenbaru. 

Mr Tumbelaka added: “Indonesia is the world’s 14th largest country by land mass, therefore operators who only operate in a single metro or perhaps a single facility have a limited view of customers throughout Indonesia.”

Cloud computing boom creates untapped potential for hybrid solutions

Indonesia is projected to witness the fastest growth for cloud computing among the ASEAN countries, with tech giants like Alibaba Cloud, AWS, Google Cloud and Microsoft Azure entering the scene.

Mr Tumbelaka said: “The growth of the cloud computing market should help facilitate the growth of the data center infrastructure sector. This has been seen in other markets throughout Asia Pacific that PDG operates in.”

The Government’s proposed data protection law and recent data localization regulations may also positively impact both the local data center and cloud services market, as companies will be required to store their data locally in Indonesia.

This uptake in cloud computing reveals untapped potential for hybrid cloud solutions that require third party data center facilities like Princeton Digital Group’s to provide enterprise customers with global leading operational support and flexible commercial structures.

“We don’t feel that PDG competes with cloud service providers, rather they are our customers,” said Mr Tumbelaka.

Princeton Digital Group noticed more enterprise and public sector customers are active in all metros they operate in, indicating that customers are considering migrating infrastructure into third party colocation facilities.

Princeton Digital Group takes a proactive stance to overcome the challenges of rapid growth 

A rapidly developing market like Indonesia’s requires Government support to help investment climates. 

Data center operators should deploy to multiple metro markets to capture a significant amount of the domestic business.

Mr Tumbelaka said: “As the largest carrier neutral data center operator in Indonesia with facilities across four different metro markets, we have a unique perspective.”

PDG takes a proactive stance in the industry by reaching out across many different government agencies and industry groups to ensure their perspective is heard and that they are engaged in various discussions.

He added: “In addition to the hyperscaler cloud providers, we feel that we are well positioned to also be able to assist local enterprise customers and MNCs with their data center infrastructure requirements.”

Operators should look to enable the entire ecosystem of the data center community to achieve long term success since Indonesia’s market is less established compared to other countries.

PDG removed a lot of uncertainty away from entering new markets by having a strong local partner, XL Axiata, which gave them a strong foundation to grow their business.

The challenge of having sustainable sources of electricity to cope with the scale of the market may also impact Indonesia’s market

To overcome this, Princeton Digital Group focuses on building data centers towards global standards of energy efficient building codes such as BREEAM and LEED.

“Princeton Digital Group operates data centers across Asia Pacific and we align our operations and construction processes to meet or exceed local regulations and building codes,” said Mr Tumbelaka.  

PDG has conducted operations optimisation programs focusing on energy efficiency within the core mechanical and electrical systems in their five existing facilities since taking over operations in December.

Their new developments in Jakarta and Surabaya will look to meet or exceed local regulations and building codes by working with technology and construction partners to ensure compliance with PDG’s practices during the entire life cycle of the project.

Princeton Digital Group aims to continue their strategy to deliver high-quality data centers to both the Indonesian enterprise market and the global hyperscale community with their new and existing facilities.

> Find out more about Princeton Digital Group

By Stuart Crowley, Editor, W.Media