Samsung begins mass production of SSDs for hyperscale data centers

Tech conglomerate Samsung has announced that it has begun mass production of its most advanced line of data center chips.

Dubbed the PM9A3, the SSD is built with the company’s sixth-generation V-NAND memory technology, a cell layer stacking method that increases the volume of data a chip is capable of carrying. PM9A3 has a sequential write speed of 3000MB/s, a 40 percent higher random read speed of 750,000 IOPS and a 150 percent higher random write speed of 160,000 IOPS.

Input/output per second (IOPS) is the measurement unit for how fast SSDs and hard drives are able to read and process data.

In terms of write speed, the chip is also 50 percent more energy efficient compared to its predecessors at 283MB/s per watt, making it highly suitable for modern data center facilities that place emphasis on green, renewable sources.

Why are SSDs so important?

SSDs form the core of a high capacity data center. Exponential cloud and 5G growth on a global scale means a demand for more data centers due to a need to store higher volumes of data, and this means a need for more powerful SSDs.

“Wider 5G deployment and accelerating growth in IoT devices are fuelling a hyperconnected lifestyle, driving the demand for more sophisticated hyperscale data centers,” said Cheolmin Park, Vice President of Memory Product Planning at Samsung.

“Providing an optimal mix of performance, power, reliability and firmware, we believe our new PM9A3 will help advance today’s data center storage technologies and expand the market for OCP-compliant SSDs.” he added.

On top of that, the PM9A3 is equipped with security features including user data encryption and authentication, and secure boot and anti-rollback mechanisms to block out unauthorised malware and ensure robust data protection.

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DreamMark1: Shaping Korea’s tech dreams

South Korean technology solutions provider DreamMark1 is planning to expand its operations.

As a part of this initiative, DreamMark 1 is increasing its server footprint, in excess of 400 racks and an ICT floor, for an exclusive high electric power zone this year.

Along with this expansion, it is also planning to upgrade its existing Internet Data Centre (IDC) facilities including sourcing a site and starting construction for new hyperscale level 2 IDC in 2021.

This means that DreamMark1 will make a shift towards becoming a total ICT solution platform company in 2021.

“We will provide integrated IT solutions through consulting, deployment, operations, and service management, expanding our Cloud offerings to include multi-cloud and AI solutions this year,” said Mr. Ji Chang Yu, CEO of DreamMark1.

In this era of hyper-globalization and hyper-connectivity, DreamMark1 pursues the business of a total ICT solution platform company that provides the optical network infrastructure for AI, big data, cloud, 5G service providers, and the cloud MSP for data storage, management, processing. DreamMark1 is moving forward with limitless connectivity between customers and neutral IDC’s including zero-contact solutions in the period of Fourth industrial revolution, popularly referred to as Industry 4.0.

As a first in South Korea, DreamMark1 has self-built a 57,000 km optical cable carrier neutral operator, accessible to all customers. “Based on the expertise of 56 computer centers in Korea for more than two decades, this IDC has been optimized from both technology and operational perspective,” said Mr. Ji Chang Yu.

Located in Seoul, DreamMark1 IDC has excellent access to airports, finance, and communication channels. Its customers are also the only ones who have access to it, ensuring maximum security. The Data Centre’s presence gives an option to build affordable, competitive networks in any region of choice.

Furthermore, DreamMark 1 also has plans to launch a multi-cloud hub service launch, as well as expanding its Asia-oriented network service business through Hong Kong/Japan POP configuration. It is also a Global Cloud Provider (GCP) which provides its own VPC service.  “We want to expand the 2nd IDC and DCI services as a hub in East Asia,” said Mr. Ji Chang Yu.

Running a world-class IDC

As COVID-19 wreaked havoc amongst lives and livelihoods globally, governments were forced to come up with fiscal incentives to help people navigate this situation. Recently, the South Korean government launched a range of fiscal stimulus measures. One such measure was the “Digital New Deal”, which aims to rewrite Korea- from eco-friendly automobiles to sustainable living.

This involves the Korean government’s plans to invest capital and support the creation of 903,000 jobs. With the aim to accelerate the transition towards a digital economy, investment will focus on the integration of Data, Network and AI (DNA) throughout the economy.

In line with this, through dedicated lines that connect major Data Centres with NNI investments, DreamMark1 aims to expand customers’ dedicated OP room for the convenience of operation, as a completely neutral Data Centre.

Domestic data consumption will experience high growth and domestic IP traffic is to increase about 2.5 times by 2022 compared to 4.6 exabytes per month in 2017, according to Savills Research. The 5G technology market on active commercial adoption is forecast to expand by 62 per cent annually on average during the next five years to 2025. The domestic OTT market is also expected to grow annually at an average rate of 28 per cent from 2014 to 2020. In addition, domestic cloud service spending is forecast to grow at an average annual rate of 18 per cent to 2022 compared to 2018.

Additionally, according to Cisco, IP traffic in the Asia-Pacific region is forecast to rise at an average annual rate of 32 per cent from 2017 to 2022, and its proportion of the worldwide total will continue to rise during the same period. Factors contributing to more data usage in Asia-Pacific include high bandwidth connectivity for smartphones and the internet, the adoption of wearable devices and the emergence of autonomous vehicles, the Cisco report said. “We can play a role as a Digital Data Hub to lead the data industry market in Asia by a surge in digital IT demand and expanding digital infrastructure construction integrated with Fourth industrial revolution technologies such as AI, cloud, network, and AR/VR, said Mr. Ji Chang Yu, CEO.

Post COVID-19, the requirement for hyperscale data centers is on the rise. Research firm Technavio, which has been monitoring the hyperscale data center market in recent research pointed out that the hyperscale data center market is poised to grow by $62.89 billion during 2020-2024, which translates to a CAGR of over 21 per cent. The surge in cloud adoption is one of the major factors driving the market. The market is fragmented, and the degree of fragmentation will accelerate during the forecast period. Alphabet Inc., Amazon.com Inc., Apple Inc., Cisco Systems Inc., Equinix Inc., Facebook Inc., Global Switch Holdings Ltd., Intel Corp., Marvell Technology Group Ltd., Microsoft Corp., and NVIDIA are some of the major market players.

The global Data Centre market is expected to clock significant growth on rising data traffic volumes at an average rate of 11 per cent from 2017 to 2022, according to reports. The growth of hyperscale Data Centres in terms of numbers globally has doubled from 338 in 2016 to 628 in 2021.

The efforts of companies such as DreamMark1 need to be seen from Asia’s fourth-largest economy’s efforts to continue attracting investments. South Korea is emerging as a major Data Centre market for multinational companies and it is also seen as a key position to target surrounding countries. With its highly-developed and advanced telecommunications infrastructure, South Korea will continue to attract Data Centre investment. Market research firm Gartner has forecasted robust growth in demand for South Korea’s colocation services.

Korea is a leader in 5G technology and has a well-developed ICT infrastructure, and a rapidly growing cloud services market. The term hyperscale refers to a computer architecture’s ability to scale in proportion to the increased computing demand. Scaling some part of our computer architecture typically means increasing computing ability, memory, networking infrastructure, or storage resources.

In such a scenario, hyperscale Data Centres capable of supporting global demand, can accelerate the growth of the domestic Data Centre market.

 

Feel free to visit DreamMark1’s website to know more.

 


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South Korea is spending $607 million on cybersecurity

South Korea is pouring in $607 million by 2023 to beef up the country’s cybersecurity capabilities.

The Ministry of Information and Communications Technology made the announcement on Thursday (18th February) in response to growing cybersecurity threats, according to local newswire Yonhap News Agency.

With this, the Ministry has also revealed several measures that the government will take to bolster its cybersecurity policies.

First, by working with major cloud and data center providers, South Korea aims to develop infrastructure that will quickly respond to cyber threats, such as collecting information about cyber attacks in real-time and notifying companies of such occurrences.

Next, the Ministry plans to expand the volume of cyber threat information that it collects to include data from major social networking platforms, virtual services from different sectors such as education and healthcare, and the dark web.

The Ministry said that it hopes to reduce the rate of cybersecurity violations experienced by local companies from 2 percent to 1.3 percent by 2023.

KT partners with South Korea’s Land & Housing Corporation to build data centers overseas

KT Corporation (KT), South Korea’s largest telecommunications company, has announced a partnership with the country’s Land and Housing Corporation (LH) to build internet data centers overseas.

In a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) signed by both parties, KT will be installing data centers in LH’s overseas industrial facilities and offer digital transformation services to both South Korean and foreign companies.

On the other hand, KT’s Head of Global Business, Moon Sung-wook, revealed that LH will help companies in overseas industrial complexes innovate by using KT’s digital platform capabilities.

“We will develop specific digital transformation strategies according to each market, contributing to the vitalisation of industrial complexes overseas,” he added.

South Korea sets its eyes on data centers

South Korea is the latest up-and-coming player in the data center industry, with homegrown tech giants forming partnerships with both the South Korean government and foreign tech firms to grab a bigger share of not only the data center market, but also the global chipmaking market, which is integral to powering data centers.

Seoul, the capital city of the East Asian Tiger economy was also recently named as a ‘Market to Watch’ for having a 300 megawatt (MW) data center capacity.

With the world’s fastest Internet speeds, significant government investment into ICT infrastructure, and a large talent pool, South Korea is quickly gaining recognition as one of the best places in Asia to build data centers.

LH’s Head of Global Business, Lee Yong-sam, said that he hopes the collaboration will create a synergy in developing new cities and industrial complexes.

“We plan on expanding cooperation with related firms abroad to help Korean companies’ entry into foreign markets,” he continued.

KT currently owns and operates 13 data centers in South Korea, including Seoul’s largest hyperscale data center in Yongsan which opened in November 2020.

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Siemens South Korea signs cybersecurity deal with KPMG

Siemens South Korea has signed a technology research agreement with KPMG’s subsidiary company in the East Asian country, Samjong KPMG.

The Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) will see the strengthening of Samjong KPMG’s cybersecurity infrastructure. Both Siemens and Samjong KPMG will collaborate to exchange expertise and conduct joint research on different areas in cybersecurity. They include information protection, digital convergence, protection technology, and global compliance.

“As the era of the 4th industrial revolution is in full swing, the demand for security technologies for smart factories and production facilities is increasing,” commented Thomas Schmid, Head of Digital Industries at Siemens Korea.

“We look forward to generating a synergy effect by combining Siemens‘ IT-OT convergence knowledge and experience in the process industry and Samjong KPMG’s global consulting capabilities,” he added.

Established in 2013, Samjong KPMG’s cybersecurity team is the richest operation technology (OT) security team in South Korea. The team works with more than 207,000 KPMG professionals in over 153 countries to provide customers with cybersecurity solutions in South Korea.

“Based on the combination of Samjong KPMG‘s global consulting service know-how and Siemens Korea’s technology and experience, we will do our best to promote the successful OT-ICS (industrial control system) security business.” added Dae-Gil Jung, Head of Consulting Services in Samjong KPMG.

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Bloomberg Innovation Index 2021: South Korea, Singapore lead the world in tech innovation

South Korea has once again shown the world its tech innovation prowess and its preparedness in embracing a post-pandemic digital society.

The East Asian country has topped Bloomberg’s annual Innovation Index for the seventh time, illustrating its overall breakthrough in terms of government tech policy, spending on research and development, manufacturing capability, and concentration of high-tech public companies.

Singapore came in second, up one spot from last year, and Switzerland ranked third.

Bloomberg clarified that much of the data came from before the COVID-19 pandemic, but it is still worth noting that many of the countries that ranked high on the index also handled the pandemic well. They include Germany (4th), Israel (7th), and Australia (19th).

The US fell out of the top ten this year, ranking eleventh.

Bloomberg also reported that the 2021 rankings “reflect a world where the fight against COVID-19 has brought innovation to the fore – from government efforts to contain the pandemic, to the digital infrastructure that’s allowed economies to work through it, and the race to develop vaccines that can end it.”

LG to collaborate with Qualcomm for 5G cars

South Korea’s LG Electronics (LG) has partnered with US wireless technology company Qualcomm to develop 5G automotive platforms.

Both LG and Qualcomm will jointly establish a research center in Seoul, South Korea to develop 5G for vehicles and Cellular Vehicle-to-Everything (C-V2X) technology, the company said.

“LG plans to lead the next-generation vehicle components market by combining our experience in automotive communication technologies with Qualcomm’s advanced connected solutions from LTE to 5G,” said Kim Jin-yong, Executive Vice President of LG’s Vehicle Components Smart Business Unit.

Kim says that the company is confident that the combined research strength of both companies will yield significant benefits that would not be achieved through independent work.

The 5G platform is expected to be able to connect vehicles to nearby base stations and perform a variety of next-generation functions, including smart navigation, real-time broadcasting, and making emergency calls through in-vehicle communication.

Nakul Duggal, Vice President of Product Management at Qualcomm, said that the partnership with LG demonstrates both parties’ commitment to the development of advanced solutions for safe, connected, and increasingly autonomous vehicles.

“With the automotive industry on a clear path to 5G, we look forward to working together with LG to meet the demands of today’s drivers and advance the commercialization of C-V2X technology in next-gen vehicles,” he added.

SK Telecom launches the first 5G Edge Cloud service in South Korea

South Korea’s largest telecommunications provider, SK Telecom has launched the country’s first 5G cloud service that supports edge computing.

Named ‘SKT 5GX Edge’, SK Telecom joined hands with cloud computing giant Amazon Web Services (AWS) for the launch.

SKT 5GX Edge uses AWS’ Wavelength technology, and the service will allow users to build and perform a variety of services and functions, including ultra-low latency mobile apps, video games, Internet of Things (IoT), and machine learning tools.

Alongside this, the collaboration between SK Telecom and AWS has also seen the establishment of ‘AWS Wavelength Zones’, which are infrastructure deployments that facilitate, in this case, SKT 5GX Edge.

As of now, South Korea’s first AWS Wavelength Zone is located in Daejeon, the country’s administrative and transportation hub. Both companies plan to expand the Wavelength Zone to Seoul this year.

SK Telecom subsidiaries eyeing IPOs for South Korea tech domination

South Korea’s top telecom operator, SK Telecom, is looking at placing initial public offerings next year for its digital service subsidiaries.

The move is widely expected after the mobile carrier announced intentions of an IPO for its internet protocol TV operator SK Broadband and video streaming service operator Content Wavve.

“SK Broadband’s sales growth continues as the local pay TV market is increasingly centered around IPTVs,” said Jang Min-jun, an Analyst at Kiwoom Securities.

Recently, SK E&S announced its intentions to invest US$1.7 billion in setting up a data center in Saemangeum as part of a long term plan with SK Broadband to expand its digital presence in South Korea.

Among SK Telecom’s ICT subsidiaries, the first IPO candidate is likely to be Android app market unit ONE Store, which has an estimated value of US$855.1 million (1 trillion won).

Smart security firm ADT Caps is also predicted to subscribing an IPO due to an increased demand for unmanned systems. In 2018, SK Telecom paid US$603.8 million (702 billion won) for a 55% stake in Siren Holdings Korea, which owns 100% of ADT Caps.

Analysts expect the IPOs to accelerate SK Telecom’s goal to move beyond its telecommunications realm and become a tech giant.

“The IPOs could lead SK Telecom’s transition to an ICT holding company from just a network service provider,” said Choi Nam-kon, an analyst at Yuanta Securities Korea, said in a report by The Korea Herald.

SK Telecom is considering dropping ‘Telecom’ from its name to shift away from its network-focused business and branch out into the wider digital space, according to the company’s CEO, Jung-Ho Park.

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South Korean Internet giant Kakao to build first data center for $337m

Ten years after its inception, Kakao has revealed it will build its first data center to cope with exponential growth in data traffic.

The South Korean Internet giant made a deal with Hanyang University and Gyeonggi provincial Government to build the facility on the University’s Erica campus in Ansan for US$337 million (400 billion won).

“This data center will give us a stable foundation for our research and development in technology like big data and artificial intelligence,” said a Kakao spokesperson.

Breaking ground next year

Ground will be broken on the 197,873 square feet plot of land by 2021, with a vision of the hyperscale data center being completed by 2023.

“Our goal is to establish the best data center in the IT industry in terms of stability, efficiency and security. It will be a great opportunity for the AI, big data, and cloud-related industries to develop,” said Yeo Min-soo, the co-CEO of Kakao.

Housing a total of 120,000 servers and a storage capacity of six exabytes (6 billion gigabytes), the data center will be designed with green solutions in mind, including monitoring systems, refrigerators, thermo-hygrostats and rainwater cooling innovations.

Kakao’s new data center comes at a time when increases in Internet traffic and data consumption are seen throughout the country, with an average consumption of more than 122 exabytes, which is expected to exceed 396 exabytes in 2022.

Located 30 kilometers from Seoul, the facility will be built next to a science research complex at the university campus to take advantage of its computing and data processing capabilities.

Kakao Data Center LocationThe Ansan municipality, another partner in the deal, expects the data center to create 2,700 jobs and approximately US$673.5 million (800 billion won) worth of production.

Previous to this announcement, Kakao outsourced its data storage facilities since 2006, while its competitor Naver has a data center in Chuncheon, Gangwon. Now, as Kakao has grown into finance, gaming and the operator of the country’s most-used mobile messenger service, the Internet giant has found a need to construct its own data center.

Last year, the Ansan Science Valley, which is centered around the Erica campus, was designated to become a “technological innovation cluster” by the government.

The campus is also planning to become a base for regional innovation growth by promoting the creation of small high-tech industrial complexes, including Kakao’s data center.

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South Korea’s Data Dam project to fuel digital economy through new cloud flagships and advanced data centers

In the midst of another COVID-19 surge, the South Korean Government kicked off the national ‘Data Dam’ project to help the country’s digital economy adapt to a post-pandemic world.

Shared through 5G networks, the project will collect and process information from public and private sectors to create useful data and stimulate new technologies like artificial intelligence and augmented reality.

Overcoming great depressions

The Data Dam, named after the Hoover Dam that helped the United States overcome the Great Depression, will target seven key business areas for support.

Elementary, middle and high school students in South Korea endured a rocky learning experience for most of 2020 due to the pandemic, switching back and forth between on-campus learning to online classes. Seeing the unfortunate effects on students’ wellbeing, the education sector will be a core focus of Data Dam.

Under the project, content materials for online courses will be expanded and digitised. The overall education infrastructure will be improved to create an offline/online integrated learning environment.

“Initially, it was expected that the latest project could create some 24,000 jobs, but companies that picked for the educational AI project alone said they need to hire at least 28,000, which will push up the overall employment figures”, the Ministry of Science and ICT said.

The educational AI initiative is considered a centerpiece of the Data Dam project, with an anticipated 1,250 projects to be developed, thousands of jobs created and US$240 million allocated to make it happen.

On top of this, the project will focus on boosting the digital economy through the creation of cloud flagships and building big data platforms and setting up advanced data centers.

A total of 4,739 companies and institutions have forwarded ideas to implement the data, with 2,100 projects being supported in the first year alone.

The Data Dam will be rolled out as part of the Government’s Digital New Deal plan announced in July.

Inside the Digital New Deal

Technology has helped South Korea effectively combat the pandemic, and now President Moon Jae-In’s government wants to further develop it to benefit the rest of the country through the Digital New Deal.

The Digital New Deal is a five-year blueprint by the South Korean government to spearhead the country’s smooth transition into the realm of 5G and artificial intelligence. 

The Deal hopes to achieve twelve goals in primary, secondary and tertiary sectors in the country, including the integration of 5G and AI into all sectors, the digitalisation of the education sector, the expansion of smart cities and improving digital access in rural and disadvantaged areas.

The Moon government will be spending an estimated US$68.6 billion by 2025 on the new deal to create almost one million jobs in the country.

To spur digital transformation and cooperation with fellow APAC countries during these unprecedented and uncertain times, Korea has also adopted a knowledge sharing initiative to emphasise the important role of data-based policies and development of digital solutions through ICT and emerging technologies.

The initiative agreed by the APEC Telecommunications and Information Working Group, consisting of APAC nations as well as the USA, Canada, Russia and countries in South America, will look to share best practice solutions and strengthen cooperation in the Asia Pacific region and international community to facilitate digital transition to address global challenges.

Enabled by initiatives like these, South Korea boasts one of the highest literacy rates in the world as well as one of the world’s fastest internet speeds. As the government combines and refines the status of South Korea as one of the four Asian Tigers, the New Deal will look to give the country the boost it needs to remain a digital powerhouse.

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South Korea’s largest telecommunications company KT to expand global data center business

South Korea’s largest telecommunications company, KT Corporation is set to expand their global data center business, as demand for data centers is expected to surge post COVID-19

KT signed a memorandum of understanding in partnership with government agency Korea Overseas Infrastructure and Urban Development Corporation (KIND) last week to globally promote KT’s data center business and smart city projects.

“Our partnership will help Korean businesses avail themselves of ICT resources as easily abroad as they do in the nation,” said Park Yoon-Young, the Head of KT’s Enterprise Business Development Unit.

KT will focus on designing data centers and creating the strategy to develop products, while KIND will lead in researching new demands for data centers in connection with their overseas projects to attract investors.

“When our two companies cooperate, we will more effectively assist Korean businesses in achieving their global reach,” said Hur Kyong-Goo, the CEO of KIND.

KT is known for launching the world’s first nationwide commercial 5G network last year, which could positively impact their new data center business venture by enabling lower latency connections and edge computing capabilities.

The telecom giant also announced on Wednesday it will launch a subscription-based cloud gaming platform called GameBox, which will likely require data centers to successfully provide low latency and lag for gamers.

Why is South Korea a perfect place to set up a data center?

South Korea is one of the most technologically advanced and digitally connected countries in the world with constant innovations that make it a perfect place to set up a data center.

The country is seeing an increase in data center investments from global tech giants and data center providers, with even more expected from the increasing requirements brought by demand for cloud services and mobile technology.

As a result, South Korea is forecast to be one of the five leading revenue generators for Asia Pacific that will help to produce 80% of the overall data center revenue amounting to US$32bn in the region by 2023.

Explore the Korea data center and cloud market with W.Media

The competition in the Korea data center and cloud markets is heating up, as more service providers are expanding to satisfy the growing data demands of the tech savvy nation.

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Xbox Cloud Gaming to be launched in Korea next month by Microsoft and SK Telecom

In partnership with SK Telecom, Microsoft is set to launch their Xbox cloud gaming platform on September 15 2020.

The new service claims to enable users to play games anywhere they want by accessing cloud servers on Android smartphones and tablets.

Gamers will be given access to more than 100 games by Xbox Game Studios and global game creators through Microsoft’s Xbox Game Pass Ultimate

Popular gaming titles on the cloud gaming platform, formerly known as Project xCloud, will include Minecraft Dungeons, Halo: Master Chief Collection and Forza Horizon 4.

“We’re grateful for our continued partnership with SK Telecom. They were instrumental in delivering our Project xCloud preview through their leading 5G network technology,” said Kareem Choudhry, Microsoft’s Corporate Vice President of Gaming Cloud.

Microsoft and SK Telecom began working together from September 2019 to make 5G-based cloud gaming in Korea a reality to cater to customers of the world’s fourth largest gaming market.

“Going forward, we will further enrich gamers’ experience by making more games available in the Korean language and identifying promising Korean games,” said Jeon Jin-soo, the Vice President and Head of 5GX Service Business Group at SK Telecom.

The subscription to play on the cloud gaming platform will cost US$14 per month.

How will cloud gaming impact the future of game design?

As we discovered in W.Media’s first GameTech digital event, our speakers from Tencent Cloud and OVHcloud revealed the critical importance of IT infrastructure and edge data centers in enabling a cloud gaming future with almost zero latency and lag.

In our next GameTech digital event on Tuesday 27 October, we will focus on how cloud infrastructures and cloud gaming will transform the way games are designed.

Register now to explore how we can work together to create your next favourite game on the cloud!

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SK Holdings pays $300m for 8.9% in data center operator Chindata Group

South Korea’s SK Holdings has reportedly paid US$300 million for an 8.9% share in the world’s first hyperscale data center operator Chindata Group.

The deal valued the data center provider, which was acquired by Bain Capital in 2019, at US$3.1 billion.

SK Holdings, the parent company of SK Group, owns six data centers in South Korea, while Chindata Group has multiple interconnected large-scale campuses serving global clients in China.

After merging with Bridge Data Centres last year, Chindata Group is also expanding into Malaysia with two hyperscale data centers in Cyberjaya and a new facility in the financial and telecom hub of Mumbai, India.

Chindata Group’s vision is to power its next-generation hyperscale data centers using 100% renewable energy.

“We diligently develop our hyperscale data centers at strategic locations where energy, connectivity and clients’ business demands intersect. In this way, we could help customers realize their business strategy together with the long-term goal of ‘go green’,” said Alex Ju, the Founder and CEO of Chindata Group.

Chindata Group was ranked in first place by Greenpeace in their Clean Cloud 2020 report and achieved the Hyperscale Innovation award at the DataCloud Awards 2019.

“We are dedicated to providing more cost-effective and resilient data center services for human development, and empowering emerging countries,” added Mr. Ju.

The acquisition between SK Holdings and Chindata Group is expected to close the third quarter of 2020.

What is the state of green data centers in Asia?

Data center operators are trending towards the implementation of green data center solutions. But not all countries in Asia may be adopting sustainable technologies at the same pace.

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Is South Korea following the green data center trend?

The green data center and sustainable solutions market is rapidly growing, as governments crack down on the growing energy consumption and carbon emissions caused by data centers.

In South Korea, data center operators like IBM, EhostIDC, LG CNS and Naver have all invested in green data center solutions, including raised flooring, solar power and outside air cooling and liquid cooling.

The Korea Information Technology Service Industry Association also launched the Green Data Center Certificate in the country, with the goal of reducing energy consumption and having more than 15% of local data centers obtain the certificate. 

But South Korea is still the seventh largest emitter of carbon dioxide in the world, and the twelfth largest emitter of total greenhouse gas emissions.

Meanwhile, data center providers are recycling waste heat for hyperscale facilities in Indonesia and exploring hydrogen-powered data centers in Singapore.

So, how does South Korea compare to the rest of Asia in implementing green data center technologies? Join industry experts on Thursday 13 August to discover the latest green data center solutions and how you can get involved in saving the environment!

Empowering efficient data centers in Korea

First up on our Green Data Center event, we will be joined by Chang Cho, a member of the Korea Data Center Council (KDCC) and Founder of Onion Technology, a leading DCIM solution provider in Korea.

As technical board member of Green Data Center Certificate, Mr. Cho will enlighten us on one of KDCC’s key activities to develop and operate Green Data Center Certification Programs to help improve data center energy efficiency and reduce national energy consumption.

Discover the global green data center trends

We will then be joined by Professor Wen Yonggang from Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. Professor Wen’s research interests include cloud computing, green data centers and machine learning.

Professor Wen will share a deep dive on the global green data center market and the artificial intelligence-based solutions that could solve the growing energy efficiency concerns.

Explore the state of green data centers in Asia Pacific

How does South Korea compare to other countries in Asia Pacific for implementing green data centers and the appetite for sustainable solutions in the region? And what is the future for the industry?

We will be joined by Jay Weon Khym, the Country Manager for Korea at Digital Realty who recently broke ground on their first data center in Korea. Digital Realty also recently partnered with the Science-Based Targets Initiative to bring emissions in-line with a “significantly below two-degree” climate change scenario by 2030.

Joining Mr. Khym will be Charles Lee, the Founder and Managing Director of OneAsia and Newtech Technology, providing all-rounded data center and facility management services. 

Newtech is committed to designing and constructing a new generation of data centers that minimise power consumption and carbon emissions, making Charles a perfect panellist to shed light on the state of green data centers in Asia.

To discover how you can be a part of Asia’s green data center future, sign up for our next W.Media event on Thursday 13 August!

South Korea’s SK Telink selects Ciena to upgrade transpacific submarine network

South Korean network operator SK Telink has selected network solutions provider Ciena to upgrade its submarine network spanning Seoul, Hong Kong and Los Angeles.

The partnership is set to deliver more differentiated customer experiences by implementing Ciena’s Adaptive IP solution to build a converged packet network for SK Telink, paving the way for future IP-based services.

“Our customers are consuming data at breakneck speed, and to keep up, we deployed Ciena to build one of the first packet-based transport networks in a transpacific route,” said Jeongyeol Lee, the Director of ICT Infra Headquarters at SK Telink.

As part of the Adaptive IP solution, SK Telink will leverage Ciena’s 6500 Packet Transport System to lower its office footprint and power consumption.

“As SK Telink prepares for the country’s next wave of digital growth, Ciena’s packet solutions lay the foundation for a network that can respond in real-time to changing demands,” said Henry Kim, the President and General Manager of Ciena North Asia Region.

SK Telink and the America-based Ciena hope the upgraded submarine network will enable the South Korean network operator to achieve new levels of scale, flexibility, and programmability, delivering high-speed Internet and cloud services.

Hundreds tune in for Digital Realty’s Virtual Groundbreaking of first data center in South Korea

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Hundreds tune in for Digital Realty’s Virtual Groundbreaking of first data center in South Korea

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Hundreds from across the technology industry tuned in to witness Digital Realty’s Virtual Groundbreaking of Digital Seoul 1 (ICN10), the company’s first data center in South Korea.

Digital Realty’s expansion into South Korea looks to make digital ambitions a reality by providing a truly carrier-neutral platform.

Why did Digital Realty choose South Korea?

We kicked off the Virtual Groundbreaking ceremony with an interview from Digital Realty Korea’s Country Manager, Jay Weon Khym.

Mr. Khym highlighted key factors driving Digital Realty’s decision to invest in Seoul, including the city’s high population density with young, tech-savvy individuals who have a higher amount of disposable income and access to ‘excellent high-speed infrastructure’.

Seoul is also the fifth largest data center market in Asia Pacific and is forecast to continue to grow, driven by demands in e-commerce, social media, the Internet of Things and gaming.

“The market is at the beginning of a growth cycle and starts showing signs of installisation. However, very few true carrier-neutral data centers exist with a global operation standard,” said Mr. Khym.

EMBED VIDEO – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-vsloGmOFTs

Digital Realty’s hybrid cloud solutions and new state of the art facility will support domestic business growth and empower more international companies to expand their digital assets into the South Korean market, as demand and advancements in cloud computing grow to allow businesses the ability to scale up, modernise and make better use of their data.

Hybrid cloud solutions enable customers to grow as their business develops in their early stage by making use of public cloud infrastructures to minimise capital expenditure, then in later stages of growth, migrating portions of their IT workload to the private cloud minimises the expense of storing large amounts in the public cloud.

“Our investment in South Korea reiterates our commitment to powering our customers’ digital ambitions across a truly global platform,” said Mr. Khym.

Mr. Khym also shared his excitement for their aim to expand their footprint to 80-100MV within five years.

Mr Khym added: “We are humbled to have an opportunity to provide a trusted foundation for the nation’s technology roadmap.”

Breaking ground on Digital Realty’s first data center in South Korea

It was a real pleasure to celebrate the Virtual Groundbreaking of Digital Seoul 1 with the Digital Realty team who shared more on their exciting plans for the first truly carrier-neutral data center in Seoul.

> Watch the Virtual Groundbreaking ceremony on demand

Mark Smith, Digital Realty’s Managing Director, said: “Seoul is particularly interesting to us because we’re a company that listens very carefully to the needs of our customers. Our investment in Seoul is very much driven by the voice of our customers. This a response to what they have been telling us.”

Digital Realty’s customers, which include tech giants such as Facebook, Uber, IBM, Oracle and LinkedIn, told the global data center provider that they see ‘a lot of opportunity in the Korean market’.

“They are looking for a provider such as ourselves that can bring global standards and a true carrier-neutrality to the Korean market,” said Mr. Smith.

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To be truly carrier-neutral, Digital Seoul 1’s key aspect is to be not only carrier-neutral, but also fiber neutral.

Robert Davidson, the Head of Network Strategy at Digital Realty, said: “We are the first international data center that is going to come into the market and be able to offer a global experience in Seoul that allows you to interconnect with any of the carriers that are local to the Korean market without any intermediary restrictions.”

Digital Realty will have their own set of carrier licenses whereby they will control all of their ingress points and the fiber within those points for the data center, without the need for a third party. 

Traditionally, international players entering the market would need more than one location to access all of the connectivity footprints required.

“Now for the first time, there will be one hyperconnected data connectivity hub in Seoul, where you will be able to use your global MSA, your global contract vehicle with Digital Realty to enter Seoul and get access to everyone in one spot,” said Mr. Davidson.

Digital Realty chose the location of Digital Seoul 1 to give customers a ‘solid footprint for fiber connectivity and positions you well to interconnect with other data centers’. 

“This is really a game changer from a connectivity standpoint. As a network guy by trade, this is what I would have always wanted in all of my markets,” said Mr. Davidson.

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Digital Seoul 1 will be built on a 22,000 square foot land parcel in the Sangam Digital Media City in Seoul, which is a newly developed urban planning zone with a high concentration of technology and media companies aiming to promote South Korea’s digital economy, much like Digital Realty itself.

The data center is also set to be equipped with Korean Telecom Licensing and ISMS Certification as a Tier 3 Green Grid Data Center, by complying with local regulatory requirements.

Once the facility is completed in approximately 2021, the tallest purpose-built data center that Digital Realty has ever constructed will include up to 2,200 cabinets, a target PUE range of 1.32 to 1.4 for cooling, and a twelve-megawatt IT load for 50% Scale and 50% Scale-lite/enterprises.

The move into the South Korean market also marks a significant expansion of PlatformDIGITAL across Asia Pacific, enabling customers to rapidly scale digital transformation.

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Empowering the Fourth Industrial Revolution

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The South Korean Government is set to invest billions in Fourth Industrial Revolution technology, with a focus on DNA: Data, Network and Artificial Intelligence.

We were joined by Professor Yunmook Nah from the Korea Data Center Council, who emphasised the critical importance of data centers to support the upward trend of technological advancements in the country.

“The data center market is growing fast because of enabling technology like big data, AI, cloud and smart cities,” said Professor Nah.

The COVID-19 pandemic was also identified as an accelerator of cloud computing adoption and opened a new market of cloud services.

‘This is the first step of several’

Mr. Mark Smith expects this will be just the beginning of Digital Realty’s investments in Korea, as the global provider of cloud- and carrier-neutral data center, colocation and interconnection solutions’ continues to listen to their customers.

“I couldn’t be more pleased with where we are in this exciting moment in terms of virtually launching the facility in Seoul. We have a large number of people dialing in, which shows really well the amount of interest and demand.

“I couldn’t be more excited to enter the Korean market,” said Mr. Smith.

> Watch all the celebrations of Digital Realty’s Virtual Groundbreaking on demand now

Which data center is the best for your digital transformation needs?

As digital transformation continues and we enter into the Fourth Industrial Revolution, you may be looking at data centers for the first time or migrating to a different facility to enable your businesses’ growth.

But there are likely a lot of choices and questions: Will my data be secure? Is the connectivity reliable? How much will this cost?

We will answer all these questions and more at our ‘Data Center Selection & Migration in Asia Pacific’ digital event on Thursday 23 July.

Register for free today to find out how to choose the best data center for your digital transformation needs.

Get involved in conversation and connect with your peers on LinkedIn and Facebook using #WMediaEvent!

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Author

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Stuart Crowley

Editor, W.Media

editor@w.media

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Digital Realty breaks ground on first data center in South Korea

Digital Realty has officially broken ground on their first carrier-neutral data center in South Korea, following a Virtual Groundbreaking ceremony hosted by W.Media.

The Digital Seoul 1 (ICN10) twelve-megawatt facility will be built on a 22,000 square foot land parcel in the Sangam Digital Media City in Seoul.

“The groundbreaking of Digital Seoul 1 (ICN10) is a significant milestone for us at Digital Realty. Our investment in Korea reiterates our commitment to powering our customers’ digital ambitions across a truly global platform. We are humbled to have this opportunity to provide a trusted foundation for the nation’s technology roadmap,” said Jay Weon Khym, the Country Manager for Korea at Digital Realty.

Making digital transformation a reality

The current pandemic has accelerated the pace of digital transformation and adoption of cloud services across the world. South Korea is also a leader of innovation, with big data, AI, 5G and the Internet of Things quickly gaining momentum.

“Customers in the Asia Pacific region are set to gain from our new ICN10 facility, as they ramp up their own digitalisation efforts,” said Digital Realty’s Chief Executive Officer, A. William Stein.

The move marks a significant expansion of PlatformDIGITAL across Asia Pacific, enabling customers to rapidly scale digital transformation.

“Our investment in South Korea is an important milestone on our global platform roadmap, adding coverage, capacity and connectivity capabilities to enable our customers’ digital transformation strategies while demonstrating our commitment to supporting customers’ future growth on PlatformDIGITAL,” added Mr Stein.

PlatformDIGITAL is Digital Realty’s platform that hosts critical infrastructure and interconnect digital ecosystems.

Once the facility is completed in approximately 2021, the tallest purpose-built data center that Digital Realty has ever constructed aims to support domestic business growth and broaden opportunities for more international companies to expand their core digital assets into the South Korean market.

South Korea is a perfect place to set up a data center and is one of the fastest growing markets in APAC.

Mark Smith, the Managing Director of APAC for Digital Realty, said of the market: “[It is] a strategic market for us to enter as the first global provider to build from the ground up.”

The Digital Realty data center in South Korea will add to the global provider of cloud- and carrier-neutral data center, colocation and interconnection solutions’ portfolio of Asia Pacific facilities located in Tokyo, Osaka, Hong Kong, Singapore, Sydney and Melbourne.

More than 500 registered to discover more about the 162,000 square feet, twelve level facility at Digital Realty’s Virtual Groundbreaking event hosted by W.Media.

Watch this space for highlights from the event and more details on Digital Seoul 1.

And you can still get involved on social media using the hashtags #DigitalRealtyLaunch, #CongratsDigitalRealty, #DigitalSeoul1 and #WMediaEvent.

Samsung reveals new NAND flash facility to address data center demands in South Korea

Samsung Electronics today revealed plans for a new NAND flash facility in South Korea to meet growing data center demands.

The construction in Pyeongtaek, South Korea will expand Samsung’s NAND flash production capacity, paving the way for mass production of their V-NAND memory in the second half of 2021.

“The new investment reaffirms our commitment to sustain undisputed leadership in memory technologies, even in uncertain times”, said Cheol Choi, Executive Vice President of Memory Global Sales & Marketing at Samsung Electronics.

Samsung, the world leader in NAND flash memory for the last 18 years, expects the facility will help to address the mid and long-term demands for NAND flash memory. This is particularly important in the age of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, fuelled by artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things and 5G expansion globally and in South Korea.

Cheol Choi added: “We will continue to serve the market with the most optimised solutions available, while contributing to growth of the overall IT industry and the economy in general.”

Samsung’s sixth generation V-NAND SSD, a recent flash storage innovation, features the industry’s fastest data transfer rate to assist the smartphone and data center market.

The new facility will add to the existing NAND production lines by Samsung, including two of the world’s largest at their Pyeongtaek Campus as well as one in Hwaseong, South Korea, and Xi’an in China.

What is NAND flash memory and how can it help data centers?

NAND, short for NOT AND in boolean speak, is the most common type of flash memory technology that doesn’t require power to retain data, as it uses a metal-oxide semiconductor to provide extra charge to the memory cell when there is no power.

NAND can be found in Solid State Drives, USB flash drives and SD cards. Solid State Drives in data centers are becoming increasingly common in place of hard disk drives to store and serve data due to the decreasing costs of flash memory.

SSDs are typically faster, smaller, use less energy and have no moving parts, unlike HHDs. The advantage of NAND flash within an SSD is that it can erase and write data in less time, allows for greater storage capacity, and radiates less heat and consumes less power than other technology.

Keeping up with South Korea’s demand for data centers

The demand for data centers is continuing to grow in South Korea due to the adoption of more cloud services as well as the advent of the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

Almost 90% of the country’s population has internet access and it is a valuable connection point to the rest of Asia for local and global businesses, making South Korea the perfect place to expand data center operations.

In 2021, Digital Realty, a leading global provider of data center, colocation and interconnection solutions, is set to open the first carrier-neutral data center in Seoul.

In a historic first, Digital Realty will share their plans to boost South Korea’s digital economy at a virtual launch event on Wednesday 17 June with W.Media.

Register for free to be part of history!

Join in the celebrations on LinkedIn and Facebook using #DigitalRealtyLaunch, #CongratsDigitalRealty and #WMediaEvent!